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Latest phishing publications


Why phishers love mobile (and how to stop them)

Cybercriminals are becoming increasingly sophisticated. And whilst we might associate hacking and other forms of cybercrime with attacks on computer systems and individual machines, there is a dangerous growing trend that sees mobile devices becoming a prime target. It seems that phishing – the practice of sending deceptive messages in order to trick the receiver into downloading malware or revealing their password – is being increasingly targeted towards mobiles.


Is your organisation cyber-secure? 4-step systems maintenance checklist

System maintenance for cyber security can be a tough cookie, especially considering the amount of training and experience it takes to pull off the job efficiently. Once you’re already in the IT scene, it’s also important engineers are up to speed with the various improvements and trends in the area. This means being not only aware of best practices, but the types of risks that are out there. Here are some glaring cyber security holes you shouldn’t miss in your maintenance:


Microsoft seizes 50 domains operated by NK cybercriminals

A U.S. district court has provided Microsoft with a court order allowing the company to seize control of 50 domains operated by Thallium, a cybercrime ring believed to be of North Korean origin. By taking control of the domains, Microsoft will be able to suspend ‘spear phishing’ activities conducted on these websites.

Microsoft investigators have been tracking Thallium’s criminal activities, as they used their online network to target victims and compromise online accounts, infect computers with malicious code, and steal sensitive data.


New feature to tackle phishing emails introduced on Instagram

Instagram has added a feature it says will help users identify hoax emails from hackers pretending to be the social network, to help better protect them from email scams.

The Facebook-owned platform says the tool allows users to check all correspondence sent to them by Instagram in the previous 14 days, helping to distinguish genuine emails from fake ones.


Tech-literate millennials are the biggest victims of bank scams

Millennials are falling victim to scams involving handing money to fraudsters more than any other age group, according to Lloyds Bank.

New data shows that victims aged 18 to 34 are losing £2,630 on average to the fraud, which typically involve scammers impersonating banking staff, the police or HM Revenues and Customs.