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Latest internet publications


Sir Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, joins Tech Show London, 2 March

CloserStill and Techerati are excited to announce that the Inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, will give the welcome address at Tech’ Show London on 2 March.


Satellite firm OneWeb emerges from bankruptcy with shared UK takeover deal

Failed satellite firm OneWeb has been offered a lifeline as it formally emerged from bankruptcy on Friday.

The UK has a “significant equity stake” in the company, as part of a consortium with India’s Bharti Global, after winning a bidding war in July.


Global internet speeds dropped by 6.31% during Covid-19

Exactly how the seismic uptake in data consumption impacted connection speeds during lockdown has been a hot topic throughout the pandemic.

A number of providers have released a raft of data showing the disruption to their networks (or lack thereof), but it’s been hard to parse a global picture from the smattering of reports released so far.

For those seeking a conclusive and comprehensive account of how the world’s networks were impacted by the surge in content streaming, video streaming and online gaming by home-bound populations, they can look no further than Cable.co.uk’s pretty exhaustive analysis, released this week.


Sir Tim Berners-Lee launches action plan in a bid to prevent ‘digital dystopia’

World wide web founder Sir Tim Berners-Lee has warned of a “digital dystopia” as he launches a global action plan aimed at tackling misuse of the web. The British computer scientist will unveil a string of standards in Berlin on Monday, over fears of ever-increasing online threats, such as election interference, harassment, invasion of privacy and the spread of disinformation. Sir Tim’s World Wide Web Foundation has put together a Contract for the Web, calling on governments, companies and the public to ensure the web is a safe, free and open platform for all.


OneWeb’s first commercial satellite internet service comes to the Arctic

OneWeb, a startup that aims to deliver broadband globally via a fleet of micro-satellites, has launched the first commercial service of its space-based internet service.

The London-based startup, which closed a $1.25 billion funding round in March, will begin delivering ‘fiber-like’ connectivity to 48 percent of the Arctic in 2020 and plans to supply full coverage to every part of the Arctic Circle by early 2021.