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Latest hybrid cloud publications


Seeing through the cloud: looking beyond headline stats

When it comes to informed opinion, the IT world is blessed (some would say cursed) with a surfeit of riches. Go looking for the latest trends in any area of technology and you’ll find hundreds, if not thousands, of surveys on everything from digital transformation, data analytics and AI to more mundane issues such as the best laptops and mobiles to buy.

In fact there’s so much choice that decision makers rarely have time to look past the attention grabbing stats, clearly aimed at making these reports stand out from the crowd. Which is a real shame as, all too often, there’s a lot of other useful data tucked away behind the headline-grabbing numbers; data that can be of real practical value when it comes to deciding what trends, if any, to follow.


Is the cloud really safe?

Optimal cloud security requires a distinct way of thinking about IT infrastructure, says Ray Pompon, Principal Threat Evangelist at F5 Labs. Back in the day, the theft and loss of backup tapes and laptops were a primary cause of data breaches. That all changed when systems were redesigned and data at rest was encrypted on portable devices. Not only did we use technology to mitigate a predictable human problem, we also increased the tolerance of failure. A single lapse, such as leaving a laptop in a car, doesn’t have to compromise an organisation’s data. We need the same level of failure tolerance, with access controls and IT security, in the cloud. In the cloud, all infrastructure is virtualised and runs as software. Services and servers are not fixed but can shrink, grow, appear, disappear, and transform in the blink of an eye. Cloud services aren’t the same as those anchored on-premises. For example, AWS S3 buckets have characteristics of both file shares and web servers, but they are something else entirely. Practices differ too. You don’t patch cloud servers – they are replaced with the new software versions. There is also a distinction between the credentials used by an operational instance (like a virtual computer), and those that are accessible by that instance (the services it can call).


Data strategy: paving the way to the cloud

Businesses of all sizes, operating across every sector, are taking note. Chief data officers (CDOs) are now a frequent fixture at the executive table, and leaders recognise that it’s impossible to be a digital business without being data-driven. As such, enterprises need a coherent data and analytics strategy that maximises what they can do with data and use it to its full potential. But where data analytics initiatives can fall down is where there is an over-emphasis on one aspect of a project such as what deployment model to make – whether it be cloud, on-premises or a hybrid approach. Of course, this is an important consideration, but it shouldn’t come before the basics of developing a data strategy and data-driven culture. Prioritising deployment risks a disjointed approach to data, which can lead to disillusionment and the breaking down of trust among employees in business processes.


Hybrid cloud – The business infrastructure of tomorrow

Technology has become a core component of a customer’s experience with an organisation, no matter the vertical market.  As a result, businesses require technology that provides flexibility and security, and that cost effectively allows the organisation to change according to altering customer behaviour.  A recent study, the Nutanix Enterprise Cloud Index 2019, reveals that hybrid cloud is becoming business infrastructure; indeed, hybrid cloud is providing the necessary security and agility that businesses in 2020 require.


Microsoft patches Azure Stack and App Service security flaws

Researchers at Check Point have identified two major security flaws in Azure that could have allowed hackers to access sensitive data on on-premises machines running Azure or take over Azure servers in the cloud.

The first flaw in Azure Stack, Microsoft’s hybrid cloud platform that allows companies to launch Azure services from their data centres, could have been exploited by hackers to access screenshots and other sensitive information about on-premises machines running Azure.