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Latest Security Opinions


Privacy Shield abandonment shows businesses need to up their data protection

Privacy Shield’s invalidation shows data practices are under greater scrutiny than ever before. If they’re not already, sensible businesses should err on the side of caution


Businesses have adapted to meet pandemic challenges, but are disaster recovery strategies keeping up?

In the last few months, almost every business will have evaluated and, where necessary, updated its technology strategy and processes. Getting as close to business-as-usual has been a huge priority and focusing on operational infrastructure, communications, and collaboration tools and services has delivered widespread benefits.

But what about disaster recovery (DR)? How many organisations have reviewed and updated their approach to DR in line with their current situation? These are important questions that deserve specific attention, as plans that were in place for the ‘old normal’ might not be appropriate for rapidly changing circumstances. So, what are the current drivers of DR strategy and how can businesses ensure they can identify and adapt to any gaps in their approach?


Q&A: Online gaming and cyber security, with Limelight Networks’ Steve Miller-Jones

As Vice President of Product Strategy at Limelight Networks, Steve Miller-Jones focuses on driving the long term product roadmap for the company with a focus on delivering the highest quality online experiences. In this Q&A, Steve explores the cyber threats brought into focus by online gaming.


Reducing the risk of misconfigured components in Kubernetes

Notwithstanding its benefits, Kubernetes can undermine organisations’ digital security if container admins don’t configure it correctly.


Cloud security: Keeping customers on side during Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the way we live and work. The sudden shift towards remote working, as a result of worldwide lockdowns, has prompted businesses to change IT models almost overnight.

Many have turned to the cloud in order to navigate the challenges of remote working by enabling operational continuity. In particular, cloud architectures have enabled businesses with data analytics capabilities, which have been instrumental in keeping businesses online and profitable in the face of uncertainty. As these organisations flock to the cloud, one common concern is security. They want to have the elasticity cake, and eat it safely, too.


Deepfakes: The most serious AI crime threat?

A University College London study recently ranked Deepfakes as the most worrying application of artificial intelligence for crime or terrorism. We asked Joe Bloemendaal, head of strategy at digital verification company Mitek, to break down the report’s findings Why does UCL deem fake audio and video content so pernicious? And what is the significance of… Read More


Cyber attacks in the pandemic era: More of the same?

Attackers continue to use the same methods that worked for them long before 2020: find a way in, then target privileged access to unlock doors.


Interview: Darktrace’s Max Heinemeyer on why Covid-19 is only the beginning

“The old way of doing security – creating rules for what employees are allowed to do and trying to predict what might go wrong based on history is useless in the face of rapidly changing, unprecedented circumstances.”


How to secure IP against threat or compromise

Hackers are becoming more sophisticated and determined than ever. According to a Clark School study, there is a cyberattack every 39 seconds – a stat reflected in estimates that put the global cost of cybercrime at $6 trillion annually,  

Among the many areas of concern are the risks of Intellectual Property (IP) theft, defined by the FBI as “. . . robbing people or companies of their ideas, inventions, and creative expressions . . . which can include everything from trade secrets and proprietary products and parts to movies, music, and software.”


Cybercriminals vs. Granny

Cybercriminals with access to an older adult person’s information via a computer, smartphone, or another networked device, can easily exploit it for nefarious intent. And they do. Every year, cybercriminals steal approximately $40 billion from older adults (senior citizens aged  60 and over) in the United States.

The scope of bad actors targeting senior citizens can be explained by the lack of experience and skills in using computers/technology among the elderly, against the growing popularity of computer systems held by people of the same age, and the fact that most of them have credit cards.

In the past, people in their 70s and 80s hardly ever used computers. Nowadays, people of the same age have social media accounts, surf the Internet, and of course use smartphones.


Q&A: What the EU’s Privacy Shield ruling means for the UK

Last week, Europe’s highest court, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield, a legal framework relied upon by thousands of US and EU companies to transfer personal data from the EU to the US.

The decision is perhaps no surprise, given the CJEU’s long-standing concerns about the ease with which the US government could access personal data of European citizens. Privacy Shield itself was an attempt to readdress the balance of privacy in favour of EU residents — but it has now been deemed inadequate.


Interview: Cybersecurity after coronavirus, with Bitdefender’s Liviu Arsene

“Right now IT and security teams should probably focus less on stacking security technologies designed to detect sophisticated threats, and more focused on implementing hardening technologies, such as patch management, devices control, and encryption.”

That’s the opinion of Liviu Arsene, Global Cybersecurity Researcher at security firm Bitdefender, a company which has been serving the enterprise market since 2013 with GravityZone, an environment-agnostic security platform that is regularly ranked #1 in independent security tests.